Invasive Species Week 2017

This week is Invasive Species Week! Organised by the NNSS and Defra, Invasive Species Week brings together a range of organisations to raise awareness of invasive non-native species and inspire people to get involved to stop the spread. Each day there is a different theme,  so keep up by following @CheckCleanDryGB or searching #InvasivesWeek. To celebrate, we have decided…

BFBI: Milium effusum

In this blog post, Pieter De Frenne (Ghent University) talks about his recently published Biological Flora of the British Isles paper on the perennial grass, Milium effusum… The choice of our study species was not easy. It is the year 2007. I have just graduated and started my PhD. I am at a meeting with my supervisors…

Size matters in African savannas

To mark the Savanna Science Network Meeting 2017 in South Africa, Deron Burkpile has written a blog about his recent study based in Kruger National Park. His paper, based on African savanna herbivores and plant richness, will also have a commentary paper about it in the next issue, so keep an eye out for that! Keep up with…

International Women’s Day 2017

Wednesday 8 March 2017 is International Women’s Day, a global day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. Needless to say, at Journal of Ecology we’d like to give particular mention to the scientific achievements of women as well. International Women’s Day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender…

Harper Review 2017 – meet the author

Last year, Journal of Ecology initiated a new Harper Review series which is named after past BES President and Journal of Ecology Editorial Board member, John L. Harper. In tribute of his of work, you can read some of his excellent papers in this special virtual issue. The series is designed to be thought provoking, authoritative and of broad interest to the ecological community.

Another way to network and collaborate

Although I like to think that I’m getting better, I’m still not very good at networking (otherwise known as talking to people who I don’t already know personally) at meetings and conferences. I’m pretty sure that this is something that a lot of people experience, and something that can be a worry for early-career researchers.

How do plants stay connected?

Alistair Auffret (Stockholm University) recently had an Essay Review published in Journal of Ecology titled; Plant functional connectivity – integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal. Below, Alistair gives us a background to his paper and more information on the functional connectivity of plants…