Green sea turtle digging its own watery grave due to invasion of non-native seagrass

Wageningen University & Research press release A seagrass species from the Red Sea is outcompeting the native seagrass species in the Caribbean, where the green sea turtle lives. These iconic turtles are seeing their grazing areas decline, because they have little interest in the foreign seagrass. Wageningen researchers and colleagues from other research institutions discovered…

Press release: What it takes to become a tree in the Serengeti

The Serengeti is ground-zero for nature’s struggle between life and death (consider, for instance, wildebeest versus lions). A new study in Journal of Ecology follows the early life struggles of one of Serengeti’s lesser known, but widely occurring, organisms: Acacia trees. The research focuses on a long-standing ecological puzzle: what prevents savannahs from turning into…

Tropical peat swamps: Restoration of endangered carbon reservoirs

University of Göttingen press release According to current knowledge, the land biosphere absorbs 30% of the CO2 produced by humans and thus contributes significantly to reducing global warming. Tropical peat swamp forests are among the most important terrestrial carbon reservoirs, but they are increasingly being cleared. Data on their regenerative capacity have so far been…

Press Release: NAU researchers quantify nutritional value of soil fungi to the Serengeti food web

Northern Arizona University press release – written by Kerry Bennett (Office of the Vice President for Research) The complex Serengeti ecosystem, which spans 12,000 square miles extending from northern Tanzania into southwestern Kenya, is home to millions of animals, including 70 species of large mammals. It is a hotspot for mammal diversity—including herbivores such as wildebeest,…

Press release: Higher plant species richness may not be enough to protect ecosystems from the worst impacts of climate extremes

University of Antwerp press release Studies on mild fluctuations in weather have provided support for the idea that higher biodiversity results in more stable functioning of ecosystems, but critical appraisal of the evidence from extreme event studies is lacking. Higher plant species richness is not always sufficient to reduce ecosystem vulnerability to climate extremes, as…

It takes a microclimate to raise a pinyon tree

Colorado State University press release With all the discussion about global climate change effects, new research published in Journal of Ecology shows that another kind of climate is an important factor in regional pinyon pine tree recovery after drought events – the microclimate. Microclimates are localized climates found within a larger one, like that of…