Harper Review 2017 – meet the author

Last year, Journal of Ecology initiated a new Harper Review series which is named after past BES President and Journal of Ecology Editorial Board member, John L. Harper. In tribute of his of work, you can read some of his excellent papers in this special virtual issue. The series is designed to be thought provoking, authoritative and of broad interest to the ecological community.

Insights into the AAET-MEDECOS Conference

  The MEDECOS XIV International Conference and XIII AEET meeting was held last week (January 31st – February 4th) in Seville (Spain). If you could not make it, you can hear all about it in the new blog post below from our Associate Editor, Ignasi Bartomeus. Ignasi has kindly agreed to share his thoughts with you on the…

Evidence for a Stochastic Geometry of Biodiversity

In the first podcast video of 2017, Julia Chacón-Labella presents the findings of her recent study, accepted for publication in Journal of Ecology, and titled ‘Evidence for a stochastic geometry of biodiversity: the effects of species abundance, richness and intraspecific clustering‘. This study was part of Julia’s PhD project on elucidating spatial patterns of diversity in a species-rich shrubland, that…

Liberation Ecology: From Basic Plant Ecology to Paulo Freire

Ecological Inspirations from Associate Editor Julieta Rosell  Julieta is based in the Instituto de Ecología at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México – one of the largest Universities in Latin America. Julieta’s research focuses on plant ecology and evolution. She has worked on the functional ecology of woody stems, including mechanics, storage, and structure of bark and wood, along with…

The RainDrop Project at the BES Annual Meeting 2016: a Focus on Long-Term Drought Experiments

It was a pleasant surprise to see some real plants at the BES Annual Meeting in Liverpool. The Ecological Continuity Trust (ECT), a charity supporting long-term ecosystem experiments, had model calcareous grassland communities on display at their stand, along with two different phenotypes of Festuca ovina. These plants were used in a comparative study with…

Fun Times at the BES Annual Meeting 2016

The BES meeting 2016 in Liverpool is now over and what a great meeting it was. Don’t worry: if you could not make it this year, you can hear all about it in the new blog post below from Jane Catford, our new Associate Editor. Jane kindly accepted to share her thoughts with you on the best…

Ecto-Mycorrhizal Fungi: A Stronger Role In Pathogen Defense than In Nutrient Uptake

In this new video, Felipe Albornoz presents the findings of his recent study, accepted for publication in Journal of Ecology, and titled ‘Native soilborne pathogens equalize differences in competitive ability between plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies‘. This study was part of Felipe’s PhD project on the role of mycorrhizal fungi on plant-plant interactions and in maintaining plant diversity, that he…

Short-Term Snow Cover Reduction effects Do Not Scale Up to Long-Term Legacies

In this new video, Gesche Blume-Werry presents the very interesting findings of her study, published in the last issue (November) of Journal of Ecology, and titled ‘Short-term climate change manipulation effects do not scale up to long-term legacies: effects of an absent snow cover on boreal forest plants‘. This study was part of Gesche’s PhD project in which she explored…

Trees may acclimate to drought, but not to warming, in semi-arid systems

Charlotte Grossiord et al. have an interesting paper recently published online in Journal of Ecology, entitled ‘Precipitation, not air temperature, drives functional responses of trees in semi-arid ecosystems‘. The scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory provide evidences that trees in semi-arid systems may acclimate to reduced precipitation but not to temperature rise. Charlotte kindly agreed to…