Fig-wasp mutualisms

Daniel Souto‐Vilarós tells us more about his recent Journal of Ecology paper on fig-wasp mutualisms. You can see Daniel present his work at Evolution 2018 – his poster is part of Session 1 and will be available to view up on Level 2 on August 19th and 20th (Poster number: P-0200, S-18).  Plant-pollinator interactions offer a unique…

Tracing plant genotype-by-environment effects on biodiversity

Matt Barbour tells us about his recently published paper; Trait plasticity is more important than genetic variation in determining species richness of associated communities. If you are at Evolution 2018 in Montpellier, you can hear more about Matt’s work in his presentation: Food-web complexity alters the fitness landscape of an insect herbivore (Monday 20th August, Auditorium Berlioz, 10.10am, as part of…

Editor’s Choice: Variation in senescence

The Editor’s Choice paper for issue 5 is a study on the variation in senescence across different strains of duckweed by Patrick Barks and colleagues. Rob Salguero-Gómez, who handled the paper as an Associate Editor, has given some thoughts on the significance of the work. One could say that modern human societies are slaves to the clock.…

Volume 106 Issue 5

Volume 106 Issue 5 of Journal of Ecology is now online! Issue 5 includes a Special Feature guest edited by Ignasi Bartomeus and Oscar Godoy. The Special Feature, titled ‘Biotic controls of plant coexistence’, consists of 10 research papers along with an editorial from the guest editors. The Editor’s choice for this issue is a…

Green sea turtle digging its own watery grave due to invasion of non-native seagrass

Wageningen University & Research press release A seagrass species from the Red Sea is outcompeting the native seagrass species in the Caribbean, where the green sea turtle lives. These iconic turtles are seeing their grazing areas decline, because they have little interest in the foreign seagrass. Wageningen researchers and colleagues from other research institutions discovered…

Apparent predation and plant invasions

Michał Bogdziewicz, Nathanael Lichti and Rafał Zwolak recently had their paper about predation and invasions accepted in the journal. You could read more about their paper in the blog post below. Plants throughout the world are dispersed by scatterhoarding animals, including jays, squirrels and chipmunks, wood mice, the neotropical agoutis and agouchies, and kangaroo rats…

ISEC2018 Conference Report

Last week over 400 ecologists, statisticians and blends of these converged on the University of St. Andrews to present and discuss research at the International Statistical Ecology Conference (ISEC). ISEC meetings have occurred biennially since 2008. ISEC is a great opportunity for ecologists to hear about the latest developments in ecological statistics and to form…

Press release: What it takes to become a tree in the Serengeti

The Serengeti is ground-zero for nature’s struggle between life and death (consider, for instance, wildebeest versus lions). A new study in Journal of Ecology follows the early life struggles of one of Serengeti’s lesser known, but widely occurring, organisms: Acacia trees. The research focuses on a long-standing ecological puzzle: what prevents savannahs from turning into…

Different “ghosts of herbivory past” for soil microbes

Read more about Karin Burghardt and colleagues’ recently published paper on litter decomposition in their blog post below… Often when dead leaves from a plant fall to the ground and begin decomposing, we assume that all leaves from a plant species are equivalent from the perspective of decomposers. This assumption is even formalized in many models of…