mallard_drake_flight

Press Release: Wintering ducks connect isolated wetlands by dispersing plant seeds

Utrecht University press release:  Plant populations in wetland areas face increasing isolation as wetlands are globally under threat from habitat loss and fragmentation. Erik Kleyheeg and Merel Soons of Utrecht University show that the daily movement behaviour of wintering mallards is highly predictable from the landscape they live in and that their daily flights contribute to…

pic-a

How do plants stay connected?

Alistair Auffret (Stockholm University) recently had an Essay Review published in Journal of Ecology titled; Plant functional connectivity – integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal. Below, Alistair gives us a background to his paper and more information on the functional connectivity of plants… Plants, like all other organisms, generally need to be able to move across a landscape.…

img_2512

Editor’s Choice 105.2 – Treeline and carbon

Associate Editor Matt McGlone (Landcare Research, New Zealand) has written the Editor’s Choice blog for issue 105.2 on the paper “An assessment of carbon and nutrient limitations in the formation of the southern Andes tree line” by Alex Fajardo and Frida Piper.  Given that tree line globally sits at a growing season isotherm of 6.4 ± 0.7°C…

E x H interactions influence rhizobial communities (Vuong et al. 2016): http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2745.12687/full

Volume 105, Issue 2

Volume 105 Issue 2 of Journal of Ecology is now online! The March 2017 issue consists of 24 papers. Standard papers include a study into the effects of nitrogen deposition on reproduction by Bogdziewicz et al. (read Marcel’s blog post here) and a study on rhizobial communities in Acacia plants by Vuong et al. We also have…

pic1_observationstent

Thinking about Forests

Nina Farwig was one of the contributors to the dispersal special feature published in issue 105.1 of Journal of Ecology. Read more about her paper below… When thinking about forests, the average European citizen will picture an ecosystem that has been shaped by human activity for hundreds of years. In fact, today, more than 70%…

jec12734-toc-0001-m

Wetlands in the wings – World Wetlands Day 2017

  To celebrate World Wetlands Day 2017, Helen Moor of Stockholm University has given a background to her recent essay review published in Journal of Ecology; Towards a trait-based ecology of wetland vegetation.   Wetland ecosystems, from marshes to bogs, can provide numerous benefits to society. They can act as water reservoirs and attenuate floods, filter…

50+ years of herbivore exclusion alters eco-function, Mark J. Lara et al http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12654

Issue 105.1 slideshow

For the cover image for our latest issue we chose a photo from one of the Special Feature papers (Farwig et al. 2016) which showed an area of the Białowieża Forest in Eastern Poland. To make the most of all the great photos from our authors we have included a slideshow below. Read the full January…

cfp1

Phylogeny, phenotype and plant–soil feedbacks

Connor Fitzpatrick is a graduate student based at the University of Toronto Mississauga. The article below gives us a background into his work and recent Journal of Ecology paper; Phylogenetic relatedness, phenotypic similarity and plant–soil feedbacks. This project started from the simple idea that closely related organisms will interact more strongly due to their similarity…

Switchgrass detail.

Press release: Wheat virus crosses over, harms native grasses

Michigan State University Press Release Once upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses. In their Journal of Ecology paper, researchers from Michigan State University, Kansas University and Virginia University show that farmers and scientists need to…